dreamweavingdesigns

Dreamweaving Designs, Wearable Art by Jo Ann Manzone

Oregon, United States · 13 Sales

dreamweavingdesigns

Dreamweaving Designs, Wearable Art by Jo Ann Manzone

Oregon, United States 13 Sales On Etsy since 2007

0 out of 5 stars
(9)

Announcement   My introduction to fiber art came at age 10 when my mother and grandmother took me to our local yarn shop to pick out my first knitting project. Little did I know that I would be turning this skill into a lifetime passion of working with fiber. When I walked into that little yarn shop stacked with wool, my eyes were like saucers taking in the bright and warm colors and textures. All of the women in my family were knitters. I can still hear the clicking of needles and the conversation about day to day events whenever I walk into a yarn shop or begin a new project.
I was 16 when I made my first garment, a knitted dress made with pink chucky merino wool on size 32 needles. It was the 1960’s, a time of diverse trends that broke fashion tradition and influenced my garment making. This influence can be seen today in the playful way I combine wool , silk and other fibers to create nuno felted fabric. Nuno is a Japanese term meaning cloth. I use silk as my base cloth and add merino wool, silk roving, strips of fabric, yarn and ribbon to create texture and pucker to the fabric that I use to make clothing and accessories.
Since moving to Ashland in 2004, my work has been inspired by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Elizabethan costumes, a walk in the woods to forage for mushrooms, a stroll through Lithia Park and the view from my deck of the majestic Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains.
I have a studio at Ashland Art Center where I teach and create. Working with textiles takes me back to a time in my childhood when I was part of a circle, belonging and loved.

Announcement

My introduction to fiber art came at age 10 when my mother and grandmother took me to our local yarn shop to pick out my first knitting project. Little did I know that I would be turning this skill into a lifetime passion of working with fiber. When I walked into that little yarn shop stacked with wool, my eyes were like saucers taking in the bright and warm colors and textures. All of the women in my family were knitters. I can still hear the clicking of needles and the conversation about day to day events whenever I walk into a yarn shop or begin a new project.
I was 16 when I made my first garment, a knitted dress made with pink chucky merino wool on size 32 needles. It was the 1960’s, a time of diverse trends that broke fashion tradition and influenced my garment making. This influence can be seen today in the playful way I combine wool , silk and other fibers to create nuno felted fabric. Nuno is a Japanese term meaning cloth. I use silk as my base cloth and add merino wool, silk roving, strips of fabric, yarn and ribbon to create texture and pucker to the fabric that I use to make clothing and accessories.
Since moving to Ashland in 2004, my work has been inspired by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Elizabethan costumes, a walk in the woods to forage for mushrooms, a stroll through Lithia Park and the view from my deck of the majestic Cascade and Siskiyou Mountains.
I have a studio at Ashland Art Center where I teach and create. Working with textiles takes me back to a time in my childhood when I was part of a circle, belonging and loved.

Jo Ann Manzone

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Jo Ann Manzone

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Anonymous on Jul 23, 2011

5 out of 5 stars

very striking, thank you

Anonymous on Apr 4, 2011

5 out of 5 stars

Love it - it really is a piece of ART. Thank you so much. I can hardly wait to wear it.

Anonymous on Jan 5, 2011

5 out of 5 stars

The girls at work are very envious of this pouch...it's classy! I'm always on the go, so I am using it for my cell phone, a credit card, my driver's license and lip gloss. Thank you Jo Ann, for creating something that fulfills my needs.

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Last updated on February 6, 2011

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