DrunkenMarmotForge

Drunken Marmot Farm and Forge

Bend, Oregon · 101 Sales

DrunkenMarmotForge

Drunken Marmot Farm and Forge

Bend, Oregon 101 Sales On Etsy since 2014

5 out of 5 stars
(20)
calipidder

Contact shop owner

calipidder

View all 35 items

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(20)
Lindsay Bordelon

Lindsay Bordelon on Mar 12, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

Purchased this for my boyfriend for his birthday. He's obsessed with it! It's on his keychain and he frequently shows it off and chats up the quality of it. Although it's pricy for a bottle opener, if your person is into forgery/metals, they will love it!

K Anderson

K Anderson on Jan 30, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

Drunken Marmot Forge makes functional art. These products look beautiful, work perfectly, and each item is truly one of a kind. The quality and craftsmanship displayed here is top notch. Whether you're looking for a great gift or a great item for your own EDC, you can't go wrong with anything for sale here. I've now bought three of these. The one I got for myself and two others I've given as gifts. Expect to get a lot of compliments and people asking how they can get one.

dlawh53

dlawh53 on May 4, 2017

5 out of 5 stars

Stunning item, gorgeous, functionally perfect, my guests cannot stop talking about them (I own 3)! I may have to start shaking down my guests before they leave my home, they are so crazy about these -- just as I am. Pricey but well worth the expense, these will grace my home for many years.

dlawh53

dlawh53 on May 4, 2017

5 out of 5 stars

These are works of art! I own three, leave them on or around my bar for guests and family to use. Friends/family cannot stop talking about them, they are functionally perfect and artistically unique. Pricey but well worth IMO.

View all 20 reviews

About

Hand forged pattern-welded (damascus) bottle openers, knives and tools from Bend, OR.

I've been blacksmithing in my garage since early 2012 when I purchased my first anvil and used a cutting torch to heat steel. This was a logical extension from welding (TIG and Stick primarily) which was and still is a hobby of mine. For both welding and blacksmithing, I primarily taught myself from books and experimentation and created most of my own equipment along they way when practical. I've been actively forging in my garage for about 3.5 years now, primarily making tools (punches, drifts, chisels, hot-cuts, etc.) to make other tools as well as experimenting with forging knives, froes, axes, corkscrews, and of course, bottle openers. Having made well over a hundred out of mild steel (by my informal count), mostly given to friends and neighbors, and a dozen or so from damascus sold to local friends and strangers at bars that saw them on my keychain, my wife (Rebecca / Calipidder) and I (David) decided it was about time to put them up for sale online.

I've always been fascinated by pattern-welded or damascus steel, which has a rich history spanning millennia and multiple continents. However it's most common embodiment, damascus knives, are often relegated to a safe or at best carried as a dress knife where they are rarely used. However, bottle openers, see much less abuse in day to day use than knives, and the potential point of wear - the tab - is small and not so visible. Plus, if you're like me, you use a bottle opener at least one or two times a day. Unlike the common mass-produced aluminum keychain openers, wear from frequent use is not an issue for a carbon steel opener (aside from minor scratches from pocket wear). So I felt bottle openers presented a great medium to demonstrate the beauty of damascus patterns and with the popularity of craft beer these days, I hope there is demand for such one-of-a-kind tools, forged to last several generations, which is the focus of this shop.

Everything produced our shop is hand made by me. I've finally modernized and now am using a 24-ton hydraulic forging press in addition to 5-10 pound hand hammers to forge my damascus billets from sheets of 1080 and 15N20 steel. These billets are then forged to the functional shape, normalized, belt-sanded to around 600-1200 grit, and then repeatedly etched in Ferric Chloride and re-polished by hand with 1000 and 2000 grit sandpaper. In general, I've been normalizing all openers and leaving them in that state, which is tough and very durable, recently I've been experimenting with various heat treatments (oil quench, austempering) and I'll clearly state in the individual product listings if an opener has been processed beyond my standard triple normalizing. I do not outsource any part of the process (forging, welding, heat treatment, grinding, sanding, etching, final polishing, and oiling - oiling is the easy part!) - with one exception, sometimes Rebecca gets to help with Quality Assurance (opening beers with a new opener).

I've started a series of guest blogs on my Rebecca's site (Calipidder.com) under the tag 'damascus'. I hope to add more entries before long.

I'm also frequently posting photos on Instagram (@drunkenmarmotforge) of damascus works in progress, my apprentice Thor (yellow lab), and occasionally wildlife.

About the forge name:
Just google 'marmot' and 'radiator hose' or 'radiator fluid'/'antifreeze' and you'll get the picture. And as a bonus, we now have marmots in the vicinity of the forge after moving the shop to a barn in Bend, Oregon!

Around the web

Shop members

  • David

    Creator, Photographer, Maker

  • Rebecca

    Owner, Curator, Assistant

Shop policies