GranaryKnits

Jewellery for You and Your Knitting

Huddersfield, United Kingdom · 248 Sales

GranaryKnits

Jewellery for You and Your Knitting

Huddersfield, United Kingdom 248 Sales On Etsy since 2016

5 out of 5 stars
(73)

Shop owner

Sue Beard

Contact

Sue Beard

Contact shop owner

Sue Beard

View all 131 items

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(73)
Christina Savage

Christina Savage on May 29, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

These markers are beautifully crafted. Absolutely perfect!

karol Jelbert

karol Jelbert on May 23, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Perfect stitch markers for my projects, Many thanks.

karol Jelbert

karol Jelbert on May 23, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Love my stitch markers, five star, thank you!!

karol Jelbert

karol Jelbert on May 23, 2017

4 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Beautiful stitch markers, arrived very promptly, thank you.

teribus

teribus on May 13, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Gift for me! Love them! Arrivedo very quickly.

View all 73 reviews

Updates

Lots of new stitch marker designs in store today, plus a new line in stitch marker holders. April's birthstone is rock crystal, and we have earrings and stitch markers using this lovely gemstone.
New in store today, a Chess set, a Crochet Queen, and a spring-like Tulip. All are available as either knitting or crochet markers
I've added lots of colour to the shop today. Another Fairisle tam set of stitch markers, this time in lovely flowery colours; some gorgeous long and dangly rainbow fluorite, amethyst and lapis lazuli earrings; and silvery mother and baby dolphins
View all 30 updates

About

Jewellery for You and Your Knitting

Hello, and thank you for visiting my Etsy store. My name is Sue, and I love knitting! I knit anything and everything, but my passion is lace knitting and stranded colourwork (Fairisle, for instance).

I have always been a maker, ever since I was little and learned to knit from my grandmother and mother. After knitting came dressmaking, crochet, embroidery, needlepoint, jewellery, but always I kept coming back to knitting.

When I first started knitting lace patterns, five or six years ago, I found that I needed a way to keep track of pattern repeats to prevent myself from making mistakes. At first, I did this using scraps of different coloured yarn, but quickly found that these were cumbersome to use, and all too often got caught up and knitted into the garment! Next, I tried shop-bought, mass-produced, markers, but found that these snagged on the fine lace or 4ply yarn and I spent more time trying to unsnag them than I did knitting. When I examined these markers closely, I saw that the jump rings used, both the connecting rings and the larger marker ring itself, were open rings, and in use were easily bent or pulled open, causing the gap to widen and consequently snag on the yarn. My husband, an electronics geek, suggested he solder the gap closed with his fine soldering iron, and when I saw how effective this simple solution was in curing my problem, I got him to teach me the fine art of soldering so that I could improve all of my stitch markers!

I now use markers in virtually all of my knitting projects; to mark the beginning of a round when knitting a hat or socks or mittens in the round; to mark pattern repeats in lace and Fairisle knitting; to mark the division between front, sleeve, back, sleeve, front in a top-down sweater or cardigan. I like the feel of the markers in my hand, they add to the rhythm of the process as they pass from one needle to the other, and the gentle sound that they make as I knit is comforting.

I make my stitch markers from 1mm wire that maintains its shape in use. Many stitch markers are not soldered closed, so that the yarn is easily snagged; my stitch markers are soldered so that there is no gap in the ring to snag your yarn. I use 0.6mm or 0.8mm wire to make the small jump rings, and 1mm wire to make the large marker rings. The wire I use is silver plated copper wire, which is resilient and hard wearing. The solder I use is standard lead-free solder, with a small percentage of silver included.

My first homemade stitch markers were charms and beads recycled from old earrings and bracelets, the sort of dress jewellery that, once it was out-of-date, would have gone into landfill. I still love making old useless items into functioning and unique stitch markers and examples of these can be seen in my shop, alongside the new charms and beads.

I hope that you will enjoy browsing my shop, and that you will find something to add colour and sparkle to your knitting and crochet!

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Shop members

  • Paul

    Soldering And Technology Advisor

    Husband, friend, maker of killer electronic gizmos, soldering expert, photography and technology advisor.

  • Betty Top Chicken and Leader of the Flock

    In Charge Of Distraction

    Betty is Leader of the Flock, over nine years old, and in charge of 16 hens, two cockerels, and two humans. She rules with an iron beak!

Shop policies

More information

Last updated on Aug 1, 2016
Frequently asked questions

Custom and personalised orders

I am happy to discuss your personalised requirements via Etsy Conversations. For instance, if you would like markers in a gemstone not listed, I will do my best to source your requirement; or if you would like to include specific gemstones in a piece of jewellery. Please message me so that we can discuss your precise requirements.

Gift wrapping and packaging

Each Stitch Marker order is packaged in a pretty handmade cotton drawstring bag and wrapped in tissue paper. If you would prefer me not to secure the wrapping so that you can check the order before giving it as a gift, then please let me know in the Notes to Seller, otherwise I shall stick the tissue paper down.
Each Jewellery order is shipped in a gift box, made from recycled materials.