HollidayOriginals

Original 1970s Screenprints by Gail Holliday

Columbia, Maryland | 87 Sales

HollidayOriginals

Original 1970s Screenprints by Gail Holliday

Columbia, Maryland 87 Sales On Etsy since 2015

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Announcement   Welcome to my shop! I am the exclusive authorized seller of Gail Holliday's original screenprints created between 1967 and 1985. Gail was the official poster artist for the new city of Columbia, MD as it was being developed. Gail was trained by Sister Corita Kent at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, and was hired by James Rouse on Corita's recommendation. Looking for neighborhood poster reprints? Visit bit.ly/hollidayprints to support my Kickstarter!

Announcement

Last updated on Jun 17, 2018

Welcome to my shop! I am the exclusive authorized seller of Gail Holliday's original screenprints created between 1967 and 1985. Gail was the official poster artist for the new city of Columbia, MD as it was being developed. Gail was trained by Sister Corita Kent at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, and was hired by James Rouse on Corita's recommendation. Looking for neighborhood poster reprints? Visit bit.ly/hollidayprints to support my Kickstarter!

Jessamine Duvall

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Jessamine Duvall

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Updates

So thrilled to see Gail’s artwork chosen for the walls of Columbia’s brand new Modern Market restaurant! What a great way to incorporate local art & culture into the decor!
Looking for a unique holiday gift for a Columbia native? How about an original Gail Holliday neighborhood poster? No shipping on local sales!
One of the prints in the Gail Holliday poster exhibit is her original poster for The Birches neighborhood in Wilde Lake. I have one original, unlettered print from this run for sale. You can see it in person tomorrow from 3-5 pm at Slayton House.
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About

Sharing the undiscovered work of Columbia's "official artist."

In 2014, I called Barbara Kellner from the Columbia Archives to find out more about Gail Holliday's silkscreens of the Hickory Ridge neighborhoods. I learned from Barbara that Gail was living in Sykesville, MD and still working as an artist. I contacted Gail directly to compliment her on her prints and find out whether more were available.

Gail informed me that she had lots of old screenprints from the 1970s at home. Better yet, she needed to figure out what to do with them, because she was planning a move to a much smaller home in Arizona very soon. A partnership was born! I recognized that there might be a market for Gail's work, and set about helping her sell her remaining originals and reproductions. After all, she has a cross-country move ahead of her (and we know those aren't cheap)!

Part of my goal in finding homes for Gail's artwork is to make people aware of Gail's unique role in the development of Columbia, Maryland. I also want her to be recognized for her unique place in the Pop Art world. Her style is clearly influenced by the idealistic, primitive work of her teacher, Sister Corita Kent. However, there are also nods to other Pop Artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein in her work. In my opinion, Gail Holliday represents a completely unique type of Pop Artist from the 1960s and 1970s. Whereas Corita used corporate symbols (General Mills, for example) to express her messages of peace, Warhol took corporate and pop culture imagery (Campbell's Soup can, Marilyn Monroe) and elevated them to high art.

Gail Holliday's work is somewhere in between, yet in its own unique arena. She created art FOR a corporation (the Rouse Company) that espoused the ideals of their New City, while also marketing this city to new residents. Her artwork was the visual expression of Columbia's values and identity. Her gallery was the Exhibit Center, where prospective residents came to learn about the benefits of living in Columbia. Her art hung on telephone poles, "poster trees," outside shops in the village centers -- everywhere throughout the New City. Her posters advertised concerts, store openings, neighborhoods, even bus tours of Columbia. Her art graced construction fences, shop windows, and the walls of the Rouse Company building. Has there ever been another artist who was the "official artist" of a city? Of a corporation?

Shouldn't we recognize her unique contribution to both Columbia and the art world?

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