klektik

Japanese antiques indigo and handmade accessories

Hobart CBD, Australia · 216 Sales

klektik

Japanese antiques indigo and handmade accessories

Hobart CBD, Australia 216 Sales On Etsy since 2014

5 out of 5 stars
(56)

Announcement   .

I have long been a collector of sometimes strange but precious scraps of fabric, beads and anything silk, linen or cotton. Like most collectors I’ve had many wonderful plans for these things which have mostly not happen because I’m too busy collecting the next item. My partner is also a collector of fabrics. His passion is Japanese indigos. These hand dyed and woven fabrics are incredibly well preserved and robust with lots of life left in them. Jim makes Japanese futon style cushions and canvases made with these indigo cottons. Over time I have a wonderful collection of small scraps saved. I have tried to use the raw beauty of the indigo cottons in a decorative way. Making “beads” from these small pieces is a way of preserving these old fabrics and giving them a second life. I think this is fitting for an item which may have spent its other 50-80 years as a Japanese kimono, obi or noren. Now the time has come and we are both excited to open our Etsy shop. I now have enough makings to keep me very busy for some time and I’m so happy to finally be using these treasures. The necklaces are made with:
Glass and ceramic beads
cultured pearls
Fresh water pearls
Sterling silver
Wood
Silk
Cotton
Natural Indigo dyed Japanese fabric
Semi -precious stone beads

Announcement

.

I have long been a collector of sometimes strange but precious scraps of fabric, beads and anything silk, linen or cotton. Like most collectors I’ve had many wonderful plans for these things which have mostly not happen because I’m too busy collecting the next item. My partner is also a collector of fabrics. His passion is Japanese indigos. These hand dyed and woven fabrics are incredibly well preserved and robust with lots of life left in them. Jim makes Japanese futon style cushions and canvases made with these indigo cottons. Over time I have a wonderful collection of small scraps saved. I have tried to use the raw beauty of the indigo cottons in a decorative way. Making “beads” from these small pieces is a way of preserving these old fabrics and giving them a second life. I think this is fitting for an item which may have spent its other 50-80 years as a Japanese kimono, obi or noren. Now the time has come and we are both excited to open our Etsy shop. I now have enough makings to keep me very busy for some time and I’m so happy to finally be using these treasures. The necklaces are made with:
Glass and ceramic beads
cultured pearls
Fresh water pearls
Sterling silver
Wood
Silk
Cotton
Natural Indigo dyed Japanese fabric
Semi -precious stone beads

James and Vanessa Newton-Brown

Contact shop owner

James and Vanessa Newton-Brown

O-Hana Indigo Pendant 6
O-Hana Indigo Pendant 6
$35.33
View all 67 items

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(56)
prinmonique

prinmonique on Jun 6, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

a nice item and a fast shipping

prinmonique

prinmonique on Jun 6, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

a nice item and a very good seller

frederick6901

frederick6901 on Mar 13, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Another great deal from an excellent dealer. Postage so swift, all the way from Australia. Very efficient dealer. Once again many, many thanks.

frederick6901

frederick6901 on Feb 26, 2017

5 out of 5 stars
Verified purchase

Love the menuki and the excellent service. Postage and packaging couldn't have been better. Pleasure to deal with and have already placed another order. Many, many thanks.

View all 56 reviews

About

A partnership between Vanessa Newton-Brown, James Williamson and the colour blue.

In our studio we use indigo textiles as our pallet. This has become a rare commodity in more recent times. Since Bayer discovered that he could chemically synthesise this dye in 1890 and aniline dye became de rigeur, plant indigo dyes are made with love rather than pragmatism. This introduces a special energy into the fabric.
From Vanessa
I have long been a collector of sometimes strange but precious scraps of fabric, beads and anything silk, linen or cotton. Like most collectors I’ve had many wonderful plans for these things which have mostly not happen because I’m too busy collecting the next item. My partner is also a collector of fabrics. His passion is Japanese indigos. These hand dyed and woven fabrics are incredibly well preserved and robust with lots of life left in them. Over time I have a wonderful collection of small scraps saved. I have tried to use the raw beauty of the indigo cottons in a decorative way. Making “beads” from these small pieces is a way of preserving these old fabrics and giving them a second life. The necklaces are made with:
Glass and ceramic beads
cultured pearls
Silk
Cotton
Natural Indigo dyed Japanese fabric
Semi -precious stone beads
Although I follow a theme all my pieces are all one of a kind. I consider the colour and balance when threading a necklace; I enjoy using asymmetry in my jewellery. I also enjoy mixing beads, fabric, peals and silver and love the process of working out how it will all hang together.
We sell both finished items, jewellery, handbags, tote bags and zabuton (floor cushions) with a strong bias towards these indigo fabrics. We also sell fabric packs for those who want to manufacture their own products.We also have a range of brooch findings for people who like making their own jewellery.We have been selling our items at local markets here in Tasmania for 15 years after having lived in Japan for more than five years prior to returning home to raise our family.
Natural Indigo is perhaps the oldest dye known to man. The oldest historic texts speak of it, as in the colors chosen for the Tabernacle of the Arc of the Covenant. The oldest fragments of cloth are dyed with it. It is a dye known to all cultures of the world.
Natural Indigo is one of the fastest dyes known to man. It was the original dye of the "Levi's" blue jeans, a trademark color for durability. It is the only natural blue dye of permanence.
Natural Indigo is dyed in a manner different than any other dye. Most Natural Dyes are affixed with a metallic salt, in a two-step process. Natural Indigo is fermented, then dyed in a process that affixes the Indigo as it oxidizes in the air.

in Japan, indigo became especially important in the Edo period when it was forbidden to use silk, so the Japanese began to import and plant cotton. It was difficult to dye the cotton fiber except with indigo. Many years later the use of indigo is very much appreciated as a color for the summer Kimono Yukata, as the blue sea and the nature are recalled on this traditional clothing.

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  • James and Vanessa Newton-Brown

    Owner, Creator, Designer

    I have long been a collector of sometimes strange but precious scraps of fabric, beads and anything silk, linen or cotton. I’ve had many wonderful plans for these things which have mostly not happen because I’m too busy collecting the next item.

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