MississippiSpoon

Handmade wooden spoons, spurtles in Cherry and Walnut

Brandon, Mississippi · 1114 Sales

MississippiSpoon

Handmade wooden spoons, spurtles in Cherry and Walnut

Brandon, Mississippi 1114 Sales On Etsy since 2016

5 out of 5 stars
(307)

Announcement   ALL ITEMS ARE READY TO SHIP. No waiting. (NEW) You can now checkout as a guest. No signing up. Lot of new items. (NEW) If you are buying and shipping a gift to someone, I will be glad to put a note card in the box and tell them who it is from. Just let me know. About FREE SHIPPING I do not offer it, because I would have to raise my prices to justify the cost. If I was to raise my prices by seven or eight dollars on each item and make it free shipping, like my competitors, you would lose money. Multiple items in an order is where you would save, because I ship by weight. When you see a Out of Stock item, just wait a couple of days for me to make some more or send me a message that your waiting.

http://www.clarionledger.com/story/business/2016/08/02/it-is-my-job-woodworker-steve-windham-brandon/87958802/

Get to know me a little bit better. Copy and paste the link above. I am new to Etsy.com, but not new to spoon making. I have built an inventory that is ready to ship. I use mostly Cherry and Walnut, because customers love the colors. All my spoons and salad bowls comes with a Care Kit for free. I put the spoon in a plastic sleeve and seal the ends, so if the post office has a bad day your spoon won't be damaged and the packing material won't soak up the oil on the spoon. My spoons are nice to look at as well as to use. Almost all the spoons and spatulas have a bumpy old look and a new feel to the handles. This is a technique my dad taught me years ago. I started doing more handles that are smooth because customers on Etsy might not know what I'm describing. You just have to feel them. Some of my spoons bowls are round, which I turn on the wood lathe. The others I chisel and scrape the bowls. Wet wood I boil in water for strength, let dry then, I sand smooth, then wash, dry and re-sand, then coat with a beeswax, mineral oil mix. Let dry, then buff.
I noticed that a lot of big sellers of wooden spoons on Etsy make their spoons on an CNC machine and telling the customer that it's handmade. People buy what they want, but the thing that gets to me is the customer thinks they are great craftsmen and all they are doing is pushing a button on a computer.
I saw an old spoon in my wife’s spoon drawer the other day, so I asked where she got it. She told me my mother gave it to her before she pasted. This spoon was a spoon I made when I was a kid. I burnt the bowl out, the carved it. Didn’t know mom even kept it. Oh well life goes on.
My pepper mills are made with exotic wood and most of the designs are from some of my table and chair leg, I used to turn. I make different size salad bowl and will post as I get them made. Cutting boards are one of kind. No two alike. Most every weekend I’m at some arts and crafts festival, hope to cut back some with Etsy.
Thanks for looking and if you ever have a question please contact me.
Steve

Announcement

Last updated on Apr 12, 2018

ALL ITEMS ARE READY TO SHIP. No waiting. (NEW) You can now checkout as a guest. No signing up. Lot of new items. (NEW) If you are buying and shipping a gift to someone, I will be glad to put a note card in the box and tell them who it is from. Just let me know. About FREE SHIPPING I do not offer it, because I would have to raise my prices to justify the cost. If I was to raise my prices by seven or eight dollars on each item and make it free shipping, like my competitors, you would lose money. Multiple items in an order is where you would save, because I ship by weight. When you see a Out of Stock item, just wait a couple of days for me to make some more or send me a message that your waiting.

http://www.clarionledger.com/story/business/2016/08/02/it-is-my-job-woodworker-steve-windham-brandon/87958802/

Get to know me a little bit better. Copy and paste the link above. I am new to Etsy.com, but not new to spoon making. I have built an inventory that is ready to ship. I use mostly Cherry and Walnut, because customers love the colors. All my spoons and salad bowls comes with a Care Kit for free. I put the spoon in a plastic sleeve and seal the ends, so if the post office has a bad day your spoon won't be damaged and the packing material won't soak up the oil on the spoon. My spoons are nice to look at as well as to use. Almost all the spoons and spatulas have a bumpy old look and a new feel to the handles. This is a technique my dad taught me years ago. I started doing more handles that are smooth because customers on Etsy might not know what I'm describing. You just have to feel them. Some of my spoons bowls are round, which I turn on the wood lathe. The others I chisel and scrape the bowls. Wet wood I boil in water for strength, let dry then, I sand smooth, then wash, dry and re-sand, then coat with a beeswax, mineral oil mix. Let dry, then buff.
I noticed that a lot of big sellers of wooden spoons on Etsy make their spoons on an CNC machine and telling the customer that it's handmade. People buy what they want, but the thing that gets to me is the customer thinks they are great craftsmen and all they are doing is pushing a button on a computer.
I saw an old spoon in my wife’s spoon drawer the other day, so I asked where she got it. She told me my mother gave it to her before she pasted. This spoon was a spoon I made when I was a kid. I burnt the bowl out, the carved it. Didn’t know mom even kept it. Oh well life goes on.
My pepper mills are made with exotic wood and most of the designs are from some of my table and chair leg, I used to turn. I make different size salad bowl and will post as I get them made. Cutting boards are one of kind. No two alike. Most every weekend I’m at some arts and crafts festival, hope to cut back some with Etsy.
Thanks for looking and if you ever have a question please contact me.
Steve

Steve Windham

Contact shop owner

Steve Windham

View all 164 items

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(307)
mnjames4

mnjames4 on May 21, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

Beautiful walnut salad servers!

Monica Lund

Monica Lund on May 21, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

I ordered a couple of different spoons from Steve and I was seriously blown away. Quality and craftsmanship like this is hard to find these days. You can totally tell that he takes pride in his workmanship and wants to make sure you are satisfied. I was so impressed with the detail that went into each package - from the little card with his story, to instructions on how to take care of each item, to even including some oil to take care of your spoons. I have been showing everyone my new treasures, highly recommend this shop. Thank you, Steve!

Monica Lund

Monica Lund on May 21, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

I love my new wooden scoops, they are gorgeous!

Monica Lund

Monica Lund on May 21, 2018

5 out of 5 stars

So beautiful and the craftsmanship is exquisite!

bunchaletters

bunchaletters on May 5, 2018

5 out of 5 stars
View all 307 reviews

About

Lifetime Woodworker

Mississippi Spoons/Windham’s Woodworks is owned by me, Steve Windham and I am located in Brandon, Mississippi. I work with all kinds of wood, both domestic and exotic. I build a wide-range of products from large pieces of furniture to small boxes, bowls, and cooking spoons. I am a member of the American Association of Wood turners, Magnolia Wood turners and a Fellow and Standards Committee member of the Craftsmen's Guild of Mississippi. I have also won several awards for my woodturning art. With pieces in three museums in Mississippi, articles in Eat. Drink. Mississippi, American Style, Magnolia State of Mind magazines and the cover of Ridgeland Life magazine. One piece bought for permanent collection of The Growth Alliance and two pieces were also taken to Japan in July of 2007 and given as gifts to CEO of Toyota and Nissan.

Most people want to know how I got started with woodworking. I was about ten years old when dad gave me my first hammer and hand saw. My dad taught me the value of wood. I started off building my first tool box, then dog and bird houses. Dad always told me to think a project out before starting. I can remember as a boy, when playing up and down the street, I would always look at their house and wonder how I could change it. The house never did get changed, but later in life I did get the chance to build my own and it was a thirteen year ordeal. I actual did my first spoon when I was about eleven and man did it look pretty rough. Dad and I would go camping in the woods, over the weekends with old sleeping bags, nicknacks, build a fire, and then we were set. This is where I learned how to make spoons. Around Christmas time we would make spoons to give as gifts and they were well received. Over the years some of the tools and techniques have changed, but I still use most of my daddy’s old tools. When working in dad’s furniture shop, I became interested in turned chair and table legs. So I went out and bought a wood lathe. This was back in 1971, and my dad was not a wood turner and there was no information except three pages in the owner’s manual. I can pretty much say I am self-taught.
After high school, I went into the automotive parts business with my mother Kaytee. In 1981 met my wife Ella. 1988 we started building a house in the woods, finished in 2000. The house is a two story home with living quarters upstairs and my woodworking business downstairs. In 2004, I built another shop to accommodate my woodturning. Mother and I moved the business from Jackson to Byram, Mississippi, in November of 1994 and I designed the new building. In June of 1998, NAPA Auto Parts approached us about purchasing both the business and property. Mother and I sold the business and I embraced the opportunity to go back to doing what I really wanted to do - working with wood. I sell small turned items and spoons at art shows in the spring and fall of each year. During the summer, you will find me at the Jackson Farmer's Market. I invite everyone to stop by and see me!

Around the web

Shop members

  • Steve Windham

    Owner, Creator, Designer

    Mississippi Spoons/Windham’s Woodworks is owned by me, Steve Windham and I am located in Brandon, Mississippi. I work with all kinds of wood, both domestic and exotic. I build a wide-range of products from salad bowls to spoons

  • Ella Windham

    Wife And Quality Control

    Steve and i have been married for 33 years now, and we purchased our land 1 year after. We built the house and wood shop. I usually help Steve with the finishing and at art festivals. I love meeting and talking to people.

  • Mr. Harvey and Miss Dixie

    Shop Formans

    We don't do that much, but we like to watch Steve work.

Shop policies

More information

Last updated on Jun 28, 2016
Frequently asked questions

Cooking Spoon Care

Hand Wash with hot water and Antibacterial soap (Dial, Ajax, etc.)
NO DISHWASHER
DO NOT LEAVE SITTING IN WATER
Let air dry.
If you want a smoother feel, lightly sand with fine sandpaper(220 grit)
Oil or Wax (food safe mineral oil, butcher block oil or my special blend of wax)
Wipe dry.
Oil once about every 2 to 6 months or just when you please, the more the better

Salad Bowl Care

Salad bowls are already sealed and seasoned

Hand Wash with Antibacterial soap (Dial, Ajax, etc.)
NO DISHWASHER
DO NOT LEAVE WATER SITTING IN BOWL.
Wash when ready
Let air dry
If you want a smoother feel, lightly sand with fine sandpaper(220 grit)
Apply bowl wax, then buff surface
Wax after use, to protect against moisture and dust

Cutting Board Care

Any kind of cutting board that gets used in the kitchen needs to be maintained and sanitized in order to keep them hygienic and safe to use. This applies to wooden cutting boards and butcher blocks as much as it does to boards made of synthetic materials. There are various ways to achieve this and below you will find the most popular methods. You can either use all of them or just some of them; it will just depend on how paranoid you are about germs. The first one I will consider to be essential and the rest optional.


Cleaning and Sanitizing wooden cutting boards and butchers blocks

First and most important way of cleaning a cutting board

Hot soapy water – Make sure to wash your cutting boards with hot soapy (anti-bacterial soap) water directly after use. It is not recommended that you submerge a wooden cutting board in water as this may cause the cutting board to start to crack as it begins to dry out.

Second way of cleaning a cutting board

Disinfect – Use full strength white distilled vinegar to disinfect your butchers block or cutting board after every use. Vinegar is excellent at killing a wide array of germs and bacteria and especially the ones we are targeting in our kitchen, E. coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus. This is where a spray bottle can come in very handy. Fill it with your white vinegar and keep it close at hand to make cleaning and sanitizing a breeze. This is also a great method of disinfecting for those who are sensitive to harsher chemicals. An END-GRAIN board is a must.

Third way of cleaning a cutting board

Bleach it – You can do this about every 2 –3 weeks. Dilute about 1 teaspoon of chlorine bleach with 24 ounces of water and flood the surface of the cutting board with the solution. Let this stand for a few minutes before wiping it dry.

Fourth way of cleaning a cutting board

Sterilize it – You can use a 3% Hydrogen peroxide to really get hold of every last living organism on your cutting board or butchers block. Wipe it down with your vinegar solution first then use a paper towel and wipe it with the hydrogen peroxide.

Smelly boards

Fish, garlic and foods like that can leave a bad smell ingrained in your wooden cutting board or butchers block. This is not a big issue and is easy to remedy. Firstly the vinegar will go a long way in combating the smell. You can also rub salt or baking soda on the surface and leave it for a few minutes before wiping it off and rinsing. Lemon is also great for neutralizing garlic and onion smells. Take a slice of lemon and rub it vigorously into the surface of the board and then rinse clean again.

Following these few suggestions will ensure that you can use an attractive wooden cutting board in your kitchen without needing to worry about any negative influences on your health.

What to use on cutting boards?

It is important to remember that your butchers block and cutting board need regular oiling to keep it in good shape and hygiene friendly. Always use 100% food grade mineral oil, (NO COOKING OILS) or WAX treatments. Cooking oils never dry and will turn rancid and waxes when dry will show white cut marks in your board. Stick to MINERAL OIL.