paxpottery

Ceramics by Robbie Teasdale

Richmond, Kentucky On Etsy since 2014

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paxpottery

Ceramics by Robbie Teasdale

Richmond, Kentucky | 211 Sales

Announcement    Suicide survivor and lifelong artist. Website: https://paxpottery.square.site/
All pots are microwave/dishwasher safe. I sand and polish the bottom of every piece before shipping. Don't feel bad about buying something that's already in someone's cart, things get added and then abandoned.
Instagram/fb: paxpottery
Long bio at the bottom of the page past the reviews.

Announcement

Last updated on Nov 22, 2020

Suicide survivor and lifelong artist. Website: https://paxpottery.square.site/
All pots are microwave/dishwasher safe. I sand and polish the bottom of every piece before shipping. Don't feel bad about buying something that's already in someone's cart, things get added and then abandoned.
Instagram/fb: paxpottery
Long bio at the bottom of the page past the reviews.

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Robbie Teasdale

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Robbie Teasdale

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Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(66)
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quality 8 shipping 17 customer service 3

About paxpottery

Sales 211
On Etsy since 2014

A mad potter making it through life one pot at a time.

I am your standard crazy artist. I go through seasons of severe depression where I don't create anything for months at a time. I also visit the other end of the spectrum at times and create work in a mad fury, sometimes not sleeping for a week at a time. Both ends of this spectrum lead to me being hospitalized in a psych ward. In 2017 I had my worst episode spending 6 months in a hospital. I have been homicidal and suicidal. This crazy was especially triggered by the suicide of my poet sister Julie, also known as Teej. After she died, I named my studio "paxpottery" after one of her poems, "Peace, A Meditation". All my work is dedicated to her. I will include the poem at the end of this post.

I first learned to center and throw clay on a handmade kickwheel at Rift Valley Academy in Kenya. I grew up in northern Kenya as a missionary kid. At the time, I had plans to become a Special Forces soldier. I was put on a waiting list to attend West Point and instead went to Mercer University in Macon, GA. The ceramics professor, Roger Jamison, had retired before I arrived and was not replaced. I asked the head of the art department if I could use the studio to make pots in my spare time to which he agreed. I was thrilled to be creating again. At the end of the semester, Gary put me in contact with Roger and I was invited to my first wood-firing of his Anagama kiln in Juliette, GA. I instantly fell in love with the process and returned to fire with Roger at his bi-annual Anagama firings. In 2012 my wife, Karina, and I moved to Berea College in Kentucky where I became a ceramics apprentice under Philip Wiggs and took my first and only college ceramics class taught by the amazing Sarah Gross. I returned to GA for firings with Roger and in the summer of 2014 I worked as his studio assistant building a gas-fired car kiln.

I was studying nursing at Berea in 2013 when my sister died and I could no longer handle the course work. I would skip studying to make pots in the ceramics studio. I ended up leaving college after three years to pursue being a potter full-time. My wife was still in school, though, and I had nowhere to make pots. Philip Wiggs put me in contact with Clarence Hayes who was just starting Bobtown Arts, a non-profit for emerging artists. He and Philip had just finished turning a barn into a pottery studio and had also just finished building a Bourry Box wood fired kiln. The first time I visited the studio at Bobtown no one was home but there was a note on the barn door that said, "there's clay on the wheel, have fun! -Clarence". I ended up going to Bobtown every day while I grieved my sister's death. I would cry while listening to music we shared. I was making terrible pots but being in a safe place where I could create and be left alone kept me from killing myself - something I had been thinking about daily. Clarence and his wife, Vicky, showed me so much love and kindness during that time at Bobtown and still do today. I still go back to visit and fire with their community of wood-firing potters. When I'm depressed, I will skip going to a firing and always regret doing so. The love at Bobtown is palpable and always a good idea for my mental health.

I have bipolar disorder and have suffered PTSD symptoms from finding my sister's body. Thankfully those symptoms have subsided. I take medication daily which I hate but know I need. The side effects are nasty and the worst part is that while taking them I feel less creative and less motivated. I have to accept that I can't be successful and spend my days in mania or suicidal depression. I have a limited time here and so many ideas yet to explore in clay.

I hope some of my pots speak to you and bring joy to your life.
Making them literally keeps me alive.

Peace (A Meditation)

Pax.
Pax.
Be with you.
Peace train.
Peace Corps.
Power to the peaceful.
Peace or violence?
The peace of the grave?
Shalom, amani, pagas:
Peace
To the far off.
In the streets.
Peace child.
Peace.
Strums a guitar.
The sound of the stars.
Your face in my heart.
Blessed are those who make: peace
on earth,
between brothers,
with God.
Peace
of path.
Of mind.
Of sleep.
Peace
I leave with you.
Peace, foreigner

Shop members

  • Robbie Teasdale

    Owner, Maker, Photographer

    I make a lot of pots in my basement in Kentucky. The ones I like get uploaded here. It is a dream of mine to make a living wage from my art. Every purchase is a small step toward that goal.

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