ProfessorKnowledge

ProfessorKnowledge

33 Sales On Etsy since 2015

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ProfessorKnowledge

ProfessorKnowledge

33 Sales

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Note from shop owner Hi
The shop was on vacation for last few months, someone hacked it and put up one item. Group of 1770-1775 George III coins.

Coins are available, if you'd like something send a message. Use the contact ProfessorKnowledge link.
https://www.etsy.com/conversations/new?with_id=73829505&ref=pr_contact />
The coins were being abused by politicians during the primaries, and most likely only certain people bought them. While sales are appreciated, lack of sales because the page is only visible to a few people for purchase when the politicians want an item, is not appreciated. The number of items was controlled, the number of sales. As I wrote in descriptions, the numbers, number of items, prices, dates of coins don't mean anything,

The coins were a symbol of things that are real being replaced by two or three other things claiming to be the original. I was the original.

A George III halfpenny (1770-1775) lets you tell the history of colonial coins. Many coins were counterfeited and accepted as currency in the colonies. The King of England, George II or George III ruled the colonies. Some coins were melted during the revolution. After the revolution started, the British flooded the market with counterfeit coins to devalue American colonies money. Other people melted the regal coins and made two or three coins out of one coin. These were accepted as currency. Many copper coins were melted during the revolution.

If you would like a Colonial America Copper half pennies and farthings send a message, Early American coins. Give a real coin that was in circulation in the 1700s colonial America ( Britain ruled the colonies). Real copper half penny and farthings coins that were in circulation in Britain and the American colonies. British coins were accepted as colonial currency before & after the American Revolution -until 1800s

1770-1776 COLONIAL /REVOLUTIONARY WAR ERA COIN CURRENCY - REAL COIN USED IN 1775!
- George III Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George III Colonial Farthing (British)
George III half pennies were made 1770 - 1775 - circulated during and after American Revolution

Colonial copper half penny coin - real - used in 1700s America before and after American Revolution.
- George I Colonial Coin
- George II Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George II Colonial Farthing (British)
George II half pennies minted 1729-1754 - spending money for young colonists Franklin & Washington

King George Hibernia - Colonial Era Currency used in American colonies -
Irish Ireland Hibernia Copper British Half Penny 1736 - 1760, 1766-1782
England ruled Ireland and Scotland in the 1700s George II and George III Hibernia half penny are British coins made for Ireland that circulated in England, Ireland (controlled by England) and its American colonies. It is also called the Ireland Half Penny. This is a REAL coin that was well circulated in the 1700s. It is sold as a colonial coin because it was accepted currency. The Irish population in the colonies was sizeable. The Irish colonists arrived in the colonies seeking religious and economic freedom. You can hold this coin in your hand and think about the luck of the Irish in the frontier lands of western borders of the colonies.

If you 'd like something from after the revolution, look at the Connecticut or
New Jersey coppers The coins were made before the US had their national currency. Coins from Great Britain were accepted currency until mid 1800s in US.

1786 - 1787 - 1788 Connecticut Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America
Real Colonial CURRENCY - A coin minted for Connecticut The coin was made to look like the George II and George III half pennies that were in ciruclation in the colonies The American Revolution was 10 years earlier, yet British half pennies and their counterfeits (made in US and Britain) were accepted as currency. Businessmen petitioned the Connecticut legislature to create a coin for Connecticut There are over 350 varieties - collectors have identified. Hold it in your hand and think of life after the American Revolution!


1786 - 1787 - 1788 New Jersey Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America .
Copper coin is real colonial coin, minted for new state - New Jersey.
The New Jersey colonial legislature gave authority to a few private companies to mint coins Matthais Ogden's mint: in a room behind the kitchen

Questions? send a message
Buy multiple coins, one shipping charge.

Colonial America Copper half pennies - these coins are often worn, and well circulated. details might be worn, read the descriptions and look at the scans to evaluate conditions. Lower price coins have more details worn away. You could be holding George II coin in your hand, a coin thats over 250 years old, thinking about what Ben Franklin, George Washington or his parents , farmers, merchants would be spending it on in the colonies.... or George III half pennies were circulating in the days before, during and after the American revolution. Hold it in your hand and think of life in the colonies as a merchant, businessman, farmer, or redcoat. These are colonial coins because they were in circulation in the colonies. They were accepted as currency in America until the 1800s.

ProfessorKnowledge

George III halfpennies were made between 1770 and 1775. This coin's details tell a lot about history of colonial coins. Many coins were counterfeited in Britain and the colonies yet they were accepted as currency. Other coins were melted during the revolution. After the revolution started, the British flooded the market with counterfeit coins to devalue American colonies money. Other people melted coins and made two or three coins out of one coin. It is sold as a colonial coin because it was a coin in circulation and accepted as currency in the colonies. There were more of these coins than regal issues. British currency was accepted in the US until the 1800s. After the American Revolution, it took until 1786 for any of the new STATES to issue coins.

In the early 1800s Thomas Jefferson suspended making silver dollars and gold eagles. As soon as these coins were made, people were exchanging the Spanish silver that was in circulation (which was lower in weight ) for the new silver coins. They would then melt the coins and export it, selling the silver in Europe for a profit. Gold in Europe was selling for more than in the United States. This caused very little gold and silver to be available in the United States. The US mint's 1804 and 1806 silver and gold coin production were suspended. Copper was also scarce, so British coins were accepted.

When Britain started making coins with new screw press machines in 1672, the Britannia woman design was based on an ancient Roman coin design of Roman Emperors Antonius Pius, AD 138-161 and Hadrian AD 117-138. Both Roman emperors used women as Britannia to memorialize their accomplishments in Britain. In 1664, after winning several naval battles, British King Charles II wanted to create medals to celebrate his victories. He had Frances Stewart, Duchess of Richmond sit as a model for Britannia. Her portrait was used on British farthings, half pennies and pennies for three centuries (300 years!) until 1971, when Britain changed to the decimal system. After the American Revolution, on early coins, the woman’s figure called Liberty, instead of Britannia, often looks similar.


Give as a gift with some 1770s beer brewing recipes
The Theory and Practice of Brewing by Michael Combrune (brew beer like Thomas Jefferson)
http://archive.org/details/theoryandpractic00combiala

or a 1776 cook book - chose a recipe and print it out!
What was George Washington eating ?
The professed cook; or, The modern art of cookery, pastry, and confectionary, made plain and easy.
by B Clermont
https://archive.org/details/professedcookorm00cleriala

For a 240 year old coin, the coin has many details although well used and circulated.
Great for starting conversation.
What would George Washington or Benjamin Franklin have spent it on?

You could be holding it in your hand and thinking about life in the colonies as a merchant, businessman, farmer, minuteman, or redcoat.....

Note from shop owner

Last updated on Aug 2, 2016

Hi
The shop was on vacation for last few months, someone hacked it and put up one item. Group of 1770-1775 George III coins.

Coins are available, if you'd like something send a message. Use the contact ProfessorKnowledge link.
https://www.etsy.com/conversations/new?with_id=73829505&ref=pr_contact />
The coins were being abused by politicians during the primaries, and most likely only certain people bought them. While sales are appreciated, lack of sales because the page is only visible to a few people for purchase when the politicians want an item, is not appreciated. The number of items was controlled, the number of sales. As I wrote in descriptions, the numbers, number of items, prices, dates of coins don't mean anything,

The coins were a symbol of things that are real being replaced by two or three other things claiming to be the original. I was the original.

A George III halfpenny (1770-1775) lets you tell the history of colonial coins. Many coins were counterfeited and accepted as currency in the colonies. The King of England, George II or George III ruled the colonies. Some coins were melted during the revolution. After the revolution started, the British flooded the market with counterfeit coins to devalue American colonies money. Other people melted the regal coins and made two or three coins out of one coin. These were accepted as currency. Many copper coins were melted during the revolution.

If you would like a Colonial America Copper half pennies and farthings send a message, Early American coins. Give a real coin that was in circulation in the 1700s colonial America ( Britain ruled the colonies). Real copper half penny and farthings coins that were in circulation in Britain and the American colonies. British coins were accepted as colonial currency before & after the American Revolution -until 1800s

1770-1776 COLONIAL /REVOLUTIONARY WAR ERA COIN CURRENCY - REAL COIN USED IN 1775!
- George III Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George III Colonial Farthing (British)
George III half pennies were made 1770 - 1775 - circulated during and after American Revolution

Colonial copper half penny coin - real - used in 1700s America before and after American Revolution.
- George I Colonial Coin
- George II Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George II Colonial Farthing (British)
George II half pennies minted 1729-1754 - spending money for young colonists Franklin & Washington

King George Hibernia - Colonial Era Currency used in American colonies -
Irish Ireland Hibernia Copper British Half Penny 1736 - 1760, 1766-1782
England ruled Ireland and Scotland in the 1700s George II and George III Hibernia half penny are British coins made for Ireland that circulated in England, Ireland (controlled by England) and its American colonies. It is also called the Ireland Half Penny. This is a REAL coin that was well circulated in the 1700s. It is sold as a colonial coin because it was accepted currency. The Irish population in the colonies was sizeable. The Irish colonists arrived in the colonies seeking religious and economic freedom. You can hold this coin in your hand and think about the luck of the Irish in the frontier lands of western borders of the colonies.

If you 'd like something from after the revolution, look at the Connecticut or
New Jersey coppers The coins were made before the US had their national currency. Coins from Great Britain were accepted currency until mid 1800s in US.

1786 - 1787 - 1788 Connecticut Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America
Real Colonial CURRENCY - A coin minted for Connecticut The coin was made to look like the George II and George III half pennies that were in ciruclation in the colonies The American Revolution was 10 years earlier, yet British half pennies and their counterfeits (made in US and Britain) were accepted as currency. Businessmen petitioned the Connecticut legislature to create a coin for Connecticut There are over 350 varieties - collectors have identified. Hold it in your hand and think of life after the American Revolution!


1786 - 1787 - 1788 New Jersey Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America .
Copper coin is real colonial coin, minted for new state - New Jersey.
The New Jersey colonial legislature gave authority to a few private companies to mint coins Matthais Ogden's mint: in a room behind the kitchen

Questions? send a message
Buy multiple coins, one shipping charge.

Colonial America Copper half pennies - these coins are often worn, and well circulated. details might be worn, read the descriptions and look at the scans to evaluate conditions. Lower price coins have more details worn away. You could be holding George II coin in your hand, a coin thats over 250 years old, thinking about what Ben Franklin, George Washington or his parents , farmers, merchants would be spending it on in the colonies.... or George III half pennies were circulating in the days before, during and after the American revolution. Hold it in your hand and think of life in the colonies as a merchant, businessman, farmer, or redcoat. These are colonial coins because they were in circulation in the colonies. They were accepted as currency in America until the 1800s.

ProfessorKnowledge

George III halfpennies were made between 1770 and 1775. This coin's details tell a lot about history of colonial coins. Many coins were counterfeited in Britain and the colonies yet they were accepted as currency. Other coins were melted during the revolution. After the revolution started, the British flooded the market with counterfeit coins to devalue American colonies money. Other people melted coins and made two or three coins out of one coin. It is sold as a colonial coin because it was a coin in circulation and accepted as currency in the colonies. There were more of these coins than regal issues. British currency was accepted in the US until the 1800s. After the American Revolution, it took until 1786 for any of the new STATES to issue coins.

In the early 1800s Thomas Jefferson suspended making silver dollars and gold eagles. As soon as these coins were made, people were exchanging the Spanish silver that was in circulation (which was lower in weight ) for the new silver coins. They would then melt the coins and export it, selling the silver in Europe for a profit. Gold in Europe was selling for more than in the United States. This caused very little gold and silver to be available in the United States. The US mint's 1804 and 1806 silver and gold coin production were suspended. Copper was also scarce, so British coins were accepted.

When Britain started making coins with new screw press machines in 1672, the Britannia woman design was based on an ancient Roman coin design of Roman Emperors Antonius Pius, AD 138-161 and Hadrian AD 117-138. Both Roman emperors used women as Britannia to memorialize their accomplishments in Britain. In 1664, after winning several naval battles, British King Charles II wanted to create medals to celebrate his victories. He had Frances Stewart, Duchess of Richmond sit as a model for Britannia. Her portrait was used on British farthings, half pennies and pennies for three centuries (300 years!) until 1971, when Britain changed to the decimal system. After the American Revolution, on early coins, the woman’s figure called Liberty, instead of Britannia, often looks similar.


Give as a gift with some 1770s beer brewing recipes
The Theory and Practice of Brewing by Michael Combrune (brew beer like Thomas Jefferson)
http://archive.org/details/theoryandpractic00combiala

or a 1776 cook book - chose a recipe and print it out!
What was George Washington eating ?
The professed cook; or, The modern art of cookery, pastry, and confectionary, made plain and easy.
by B Clermont
https://archive.org/details/professedcookorm00cleriala

For a 240 year old coin, the coin has many details although well used and circulated.
Great for starting conversation.
What would George Washington or Benjamin Franklin have spent it on?

You could be holding it in your hand and thinking about life in the colonies as a merchant, businessman, farmer, minuteman, or redcoat.....

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About

ProfessorKnowledge 1700s coins used in Colonial America / American Revolutionary era, Early American state coins

ProfessorKnowledge ---
Hi, take a look,
buy as a gift or start collecting Colonial coins yourself !

Colonial America Copper half pennies and farthings, Early American coins
Give a real coin that was in circulation in the 1700s colonial America ( Britain ruled the colonies) These are real copper half penny coins that were in circulation in the 1700's colonies. British coins were accepted as colonial currency before & after the American Revolution -until 1800s

A George III halfpenny lets you tell the history of colonial coins. Many coins were counterfeited and accepted as currency in the colonies. The King of England, George II or George III ruled the colonies. Some coins were melted during the revolution. After the revolution started, the British flooded the market with counterfeit coins to devalue American colonies money. Other people melted the regal coins and made two or three coins out of one coin. These were accepted as currency. Many copper coins were melted during the revolution.

1770-1776 COLONIAL /REVOLUTIONARY WAR ERA COIN CURRENCY - REAL COIN USED IN 1775!
- George III Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George III Colonial Farthing (British)
George III half pennies were made 1770 - 1775 - circulated during and after American Revolution

Colonial copper half penny coin - real - used in 1700s America before and after American Revolution.
- George I Colonial Coin
- George II Colonial Half Penny (British)
- George II Colonial Farthing (British)
George II half pennies minted 1729-1754 - spending money for young colonists Franklin & Washington

King George Hibernia - Colonial Era Currency used in American colonies -
Irish Ireland Hibernia Copper British Half Penny 1736 - 1760, 1766-1782
England ruled Ireland and Scotland in the 1700s George II and George III Hibernia half penny are British coins made for Ireland that circulated in England, Ireland (controlled by England) and its American colonies. It is also called the Ireland Half Penny. This is a REAL coin that was well circulated in the 1700s. It is sold as a colonial coin because it was accepted currency. The Irish population in the colonies was sizeable. The Irish colonists arrived in the colonies seeking religious and economic freedom. You can hold this coin in your hand and think about the luck of the Irish in the frontier lands of western borders of the colonies.

If you 'd like something from after the revolution, look at the Connecticut or
New Jersey coppers The coins were made before the US had their national currency. Coins from Great Britain were accepted currency until mid 1800s in US.

1786 - 1787 - 1788 Connecticut Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America
Real Colonial CURRENCY - A coin minted for Connecticut The coin was made to look like the George II and George III half pennies that were in ciruclation in the colonies The American Revolution was 10 years earlier, yet British half pennies and their counterfeits (made in US and Britain) were accepted as currency. Businessmen petitioned the Connecticut legislature to create a coin for Connecticut There are over 350 varieties - collectors have identified. Hold it in your hand and think of life after the American Revolution!


1786 - 1787 - 1788 New Jersey Copper coin - Coin used in newly formed United States of America .
Copper coin is real colonial coin, minted for new state - New Jersey.
The New Jersey colonial legislature gave authority to a few private companies to mint coins Matthais Ogden's mint: in a room behind the kitchen

Questions? send a message
Buy multiple coins, one shipping charge.

Colonial America Copper half pennies - these coins are often worn, and well circulated. details might be worn, read the descriptions and look at the scans to evaluate conditions. Lower price coins have more details worn away. You could be holding George II coin in your hand, a coin thats over 250 years old, thinking about what Ben Franklin, George Washington or his parents , farmers, merchants would be spending it on in the colonies.... or George III half pennies were circulating in the days before, during and after the American revolution. Hold it in your hand and think of life in the colonies as a merchant, businessman, farmer, or redcoat. These are colonial coins because they were in circulation in the colonies. They were accepted as currency in America until the 1800s.

Shop policies

Last updated on October 10, 2015
HI
If you like to buy multiple coins, the shipping costs are combined.
If you want regular first class mail, it is $2.75

Or coins can be shipped via US Postal Service Priority Mail, 2 -3 delivery in most of US for one shipping price. $6.50

If you have a question, send a message.

Accepted payment methods

Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Shipping
Most orders are shipped the next business day after purchase. Coins purchased on weekend ship on Monday. You'll recieve tracking info after the coin ships.

If you like to buy multiple coins, the shipping costs are combined.
If you want regular first class mail, it is $2.75.
Order three coins or more ProfessorKnowledge ships your order priority mail for $2.75

Or coins can be shipped via US Postal Service Priority Mail, 2 -3 delivery in most of US for one shipping price. $6.50

If you have a question, send a message.