Swampbird

Swampbird's Place.

Ixonia, Wisconsin

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Announcement    Welcome to Swampbird's Place!

I am very happy you found your way. Please stay awhile and take a look around.

WowI The heat is on and although we have received some very well needed rain, much more is needed. It is such a great feeling to see these little guys using the feeders so early in the morning to keep humming. Please remember to change unused nectar and keep all of the feeders you may have clean. Every little bit you can do will help these fantastic little guys along and keep them coming back for many years.

I was lucky enough to see my first Ruby- throated hummingbird as a child, in 1963. Along a creek deep within an ancient oak savannah, where I lived, was a large wild honeysuckle bush in full bloom that was very active with hummingbirds zinging about, coming and going in all directions. I was amazed at these emerald like little beings, hearing the hum of their wings moments before I could see them, I could not believe what I was seeing.

In the Spring of 1979, I reconnected. While camping among the cedars in Sand Dunes National Park, I found myself very unexpectedly in the midst of breeding season for the Black-chinned hummingbird. I found if I sat very low and still, I was able to witness many courtship displays, some within feet of me as the hens would zip by and land within the cedar branches, followed very quickly by a male. His "dance," would begin the display, up and down in a cross shaped pattern directly in front of her, ending with a tremendous pendulum swings, diving from great heights. I was totally hooked.

Although I worked professionally with much larger birds, (endangered cranes at the International Crane Foundation) in the 80's. I began to really study the Ruby-throated hummingbirds and their habits 25 years years ago. First making and testing my own feeders, when I wanted a more predictable way to photograph, identify and record the different individual hummingbirds that were coming to my feeders throughout the season, not just a total count. Adding a bit of safe dangling red shiny glass "Pzazz," the hummers wasted no time in using them. I enjoy creating every individual feeder and love the look in children's eyes when they see them up close for the first time. Bringing the beauty of nature a little bit closer, I wanted to bring that joy to other people to discover.

The Ruby-throated hummingbirds normally make their Spring debut here every year in Wisconsin on May 2nd and they have returned here right on time. The competition over the ladies has increased as we head farther into mating season.

Wisconsin had a confirmed report with photos of a Mexican Violet Ear hummingbird a few counties away this past summer. This is an extremely rare bird for Wisconsin. A few Anna's hummingbirds have been seen and tagged in other parts of the state during the past two seasons. One was reported to have remained through the beginning of December, 2018. Along with a confirmed Roufus in November of 2018 and summer of 2019.

In the past four years I have expanded my flower gardens to well over 150 ft of annuals and perennials including many native plants that bloom through out the entire summer, to help accommodate these little beings. Last year I added the night blooming Four O'Clocks (they have a very strong jasmine like fragrance and the hummingbirds love them early in the morning,) different sedum varieties. For annuals that bloom until frost, one of my favorites is the Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia) aka "the Torch". The variety I use grows to be over 12 ft tall. It is a bee, butterfly and hummingbird magnet and it blooms well into Fall. I added the smaller, Red Speciosa, Yellow Speciosa and Sundance version this past season and have been very pleased each new season as more and more hummingbirds take up close temporary residence.

My window feeders have been featured in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. (April, 2017) Highlighting 9 Wisconsin artisans, the article, written by Alison Sherwood, web producer for the Journal Sentinel's lifestyle section, Fresh.

It is very important to keep the outside of any feeder you have clean and free of any sugar solution to avoid any unwanted pests. When refilling tubes, leave a visible gap between the sugar solution and the inside of the cap. This prevents dripping and bees and wasps from reaching it and it becomes more of a bee proof type cap.

Thank you for stopping by!

Swampbird

Announcement

Last updated on Jun 30, 2021

Welcome to Swampbird's Place!

I am very happy you found your way. Please stay awhile and take a look around.

WowI The heat is on and although we have received some very well needed rain, much more is needed. It is such a great feeling to see these little guys using the feeders so early in the morning to keep humming. Please remember to change unused nectar and keep all of the feeders you may have clean. Every little bit you can do will help these fantastic little guys along and keep them coming back for many years.

I was lucky enough to see my first Ruby- throated hummingbird as a child, in 1963. Along a creek deep within an ancient oak savannah, where I lived, was a large wild honeysuckle bush in full bloom that was very active with hummingbirds zinging about, coming and going in all directions. I was amazed at these emerald like little beings, hearing the hum of their wings moments before I could see them, I could not believe what I was seeing.

In the Spring of 1979, I reconnected. While camping among the cedars in Sand Dunes National Park, I found myself very unexpectedly in the midst of breeding season for the Black-chinned hummingbird. I found if I sat very low and still, I was able to witness many courtship displays, some within feet of me as the hens would zip by and land within the cedar branches, followed very quickly by a male. His "dance," would begin the display, up and down in a cross shaped pattern directly in front of her, ending with a tremendous pendulum swings, diving from great heights. I was totally hooked.

Although I worked professionally with much larger birds, (endangered cranes at the International Crane Foundation) in the 80's. I began to really study the Ruby-throated hummingbirds and their habits 25 years years ago. First making and testing my own feeders, when I wanted a more predictable way to photograph, identify and record the different individual hummingbirds that were coming to my feeders throughout the season, not just a total count. Adding a bit of safe dangling red shiny glass "Pzazz," the hummers wasted no time in using them. I enjoy creating every individual feeder and love the look in children's eyes when they see them up close for the first time. Bringing the beauty of nature a little bit closer, I wanted to bring that joy to other people to discover.

The Ruby-throated hummingbirds normally make their Spring debut here every year in Wisconsin on May 2nd and they have returned here right on time. The competition over the ladies has increased as we head farther into mating season.

Wisconsin had a confirmed report with photos of a Mexican Violet Ear hummingbird a few counties away this past summer. This is an extremely rare bird for Wisconsin. A few Anna's hummingbirds have been seen and tagged in other parts of the state during the past two seasons. One was reported to have remained through the beginning of December, 2018. Along with a confirmed Roufus in November of 2018 and summer of 2019.

In the past four years I have expanded my flower gardens to well over 150 ft of annuals and perennials including many native plants that bloom through out the entire summer, to help accommodate these little beings. Last year I added the night blooming Four O'Clocks (they have a very strong jasmine like fragrance and the hummingbirds love them early in the morning,) different sedum varieties. For annuals that bloom until frost, one of my favorites is the Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia) aka "the Torch". The variety I use grows to be over 12 ft tall. It is a bee, butterfly and hummingbird magnet and it blooms well into Fall. I added the smaller, Red Speciosa, Yellow Speciosa and Sundance version this past season and have been very pleased each new season as more and more hummingbirds take up close temporary residence.

My window feeders have been featured in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. (April, 2017) Highlighting 9 Wisconsin artisans, the article, written by Alison Sherwood, web producer for the Journal Sentinel's lifestyle section, Fresh.

It is very important to keep the outside of any feeder you have clean and free of any sugar solution to avoid any unwanted pests. When refilling tubes, leave a visible gap between the sugar solution and the inside of the cap. This prevents dripping and bees and wasps from reaching it and it becomes more of a bee proof type cap.

Thank you for stopping by!

Swampbird

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On Etsy since 2016

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