thebeadchest

African Beads, Recycled Glass Beads, Trade Beads

California, United States · 28215 Sales

thebeadchest

African Beads, Recycled Glass Beads, Trade Beads

California, United States 28215 Sales On Etsy since 2009

5 out of 5 stars
(5811)

Announcement   FREE SHIPPING ON USA ORDERS OVER $99 - Use coupon code FREESHIP99

ALL OTHER ORDERS - Pay shipping for first item - receive free shipping on all additional items!!!

Browse a huge selection of African trade beads and recycled glass beads at wholesale prices.

Much has been written about the birth of bead-making in Africa during the prestigious 'trade era', but what many people don't know is that Africa's love affair with beads for self adornment actually began more than 75,000 years ago. The earliest African beads uncovered by archaeologists are a variation of Heishi Beads made from the shells of mud snails, many of which are believed to derive from a single item of adornment. Small, versatile and rustic, natural Heishi Beads made from ostrich and crab shells have since been adopted by numerous African cultures for ritual jewelry pieces, including the magnificent beaded wedding collars worn by both Yoruban and Ghanaian tribes people.

African tribes are well known for their resourcefulness. Even before the discovery of metal ores and glass-making techniques, African artisans were using all natural materials at their disposal to produce beads for creative expression and adornment. Horn, bone and clay were considered particularly versatile materials, since they were easy to shape, carve and manipulate with vegetable dyes. Dyed Batik Bone Beads from Kenya are a great example of these early practices.

As trade routes were established throughout Africa, many tribes began to realize the value of Gemstone Beads – in particular, turquoise and carnelian. Since many of these elements were not native to many parts of Africa, tribes began producing their own clever imitations from natural elements such as jasper and bauxite. Turquoise and Bauxite Beads continue to be mass produced today in the bead-making hubs of Ghana and Ethiopia. Of course, these areas are perhaps better known for their thriving glass bead production, which began in earnest during the 19th Century. Inspired by the exquisitely beautiful trade beads brought over by merchants from Venice, artisans from the Krobo and Ashanti tribes began exploring their own ways of reproducing them from recycled glass scrap. Recycled Glass Beads are now one of the leading exports of Ghana, helping millions to evade poverty and generate a regular income for their families.

Please note, according to Etsy policy, buyers are fully responsible for customs and duty fees in their own country: https://www.etsy.com/help/article/5023

Announcement

FREE SHIPPING ON USA ORDERS OVER $99 - Use coupon code FREESHIP99

ALL OTHER ORDERS - Pay shipping for first item - receive free shipping on all additional items!!!

Browse a huge selection of African trade beads and recycled glass beads at wholesale prices.

Much has been written about the birth of bead-making in Africa during the prestigious 'trade era', but what many people don't know is that Africa's love affair with beads for self adornment actually began more than 75,000 years ago. The earliest African beads uncovered by archaeologists are a variation of Heishi Beads made from the shells of mud snails, many of which are believed to derive from a single item of adornment. Small, versatile and rustic, natural Heishi Beads made from ostrich and crab shells have since been adopted by numerous African cultures for ritual jewelry pieces, including the magnificent beaded wedding collars worn by both Yoruban and Ghanaian tribes people.

African tribes are well known for their resourcefulness. Even before the discovery of metal ores and glass-making techniques, African artisans were using all natural materials at their disposal to produce beads for creative expression and adornment. Horn, bone and clay were considered particularly versatile materials, since they were easy to shape, carve and manipulate with vegetable dyes. Dyed Batik Bone Beads from Kenya are a great example of these early practices.

As trade routes were established throughout Africa, many tribes began to realize the value of Gemstone Beads – in particular, turquoise and carnelian. Since many of these elements were not native to many parts of Africa, tribes began producing their own clever imitations from natural elements such as jasper and bauxite. Turquoise and Bauxite Beads continue to be mass produced today in the bead-making hubs of Ghana and Ethiopia. Of course, these areas are perhaps better known for their thriving glass bead production, which began in earnest during the 19th Century. Inspired by the exquisitely beautiful trade beads brought over by merchants from Venice, artisans from the Krobo and Ashanti tribes began exploring their own ways of reproducing them from recycled glass scrap. Recycled Glass Beads are now one of the leading exports of Ghana, helping millions to evade poverty and generate a regular income for their families.

Please note, according to Etsy policy, buyers are fully responsible for customs and duty fees in their own country: https://www.etsy.com/help/article/5023

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Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(5811)
Beverly Siek

Beverly Siek on Jul 30, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

I knew these beads would be good....but they are fabulous! Can't wait to try mixing them in with other materials. I am so glad I have found this seller. The bead selection is just what I'm looking for and it's been a great experience. Again, the order arrived very quickly. Thank you!

Beverly Siek

Beverly Siek on Jul 30, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

These beads are in a color that is difficult to find. I am so happy with them! The order came so quickly....I can't wait to start work on some new projects. Very pleased all around!

Beverly Siek

Beverly Siek on Jul 30, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

Perfect! I have worked with similar beads but in a larger size and wanted something in this size range to use in bracelets. The quality is very nice. The order came quite quickly. Love this seller!

Beverly Siek

Beverly Siek on Jul 30, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

These beads are wonderful. They are heavy for their size, and I can't wait to experiment on mixing them with other materials. This shipment was received very promptly. Love the selection at this site. Great seller!

Beverly Siek

Beverly Siek on Jul 30, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

These beads are so beautiful! Rustic and so full of colors. I received this order very promptly and all the beads are exactly what I'd hoped. Great seller! I will definitely be a repeat customer.

View all 5811 reviews

Shop policies

Last updated on November 18, 2015

Accepted payment methods

  • Accepts Etsy gift cards
Payment
We accept all major credit cards and Paypal.
Shipping
Most orders ship out of our warehouse within one business day. Free USA shipping on all orders over $99!

We also offer combined flat rate shipping on all orders: pay shipping for the first item, and receive free shipping on all additional items.

In order to receive the combined shipping discount, please add all items to your cart before making payment. If you would like to add items to your order after you have already made payment, please place an additional order and send us a message asking for refund on duplicate shipping charges. We will be happy to combine the shipments and refund you on duplicate shipping charges so long as your initial order has not yet shipped out!
Refunds and Exchanges
We offer a flexible return policy. You may return items in their original condition within 14 business days of receipt, for a full refund on the cost of products.
Additional policies and FAQs
Buyers are fully responsible for all custom taxes and duty fees in their home country.