Hypnovamp is taking a short break

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Note from shop owner Dear Space Witches,
I will be taking a quick summer break and traveling on the West Coast until August 30th. I'll still be updating my Instagram during this time so feel free to contact me through there with any questions! (@hypnovamp_designs)
See you in a couple weeks,
xoxo Stephanie

Note from shop owner

Last updated on Aug 15, 2018

Dear Space Witches,
I will be taking a quick summer break and traveling on the West Coast until August 30th. I'll still be updating my Instagram during this time so feel free to contact me through there with any questions! (@hypnovamp_designs)
See you in a couple weeks,
xoxo Stephanie

Stephanie Smiszek

Contact shop owner

Stephanie Smiszek

About

With influences rooted in witchcraft, sci-fi, and mid-century design, Hypnovamp provides unique adornment for the modern space vixen.

My artistic aesthetic has always been informed by the unusual.
Having spent my childhood in the beautiful city of Salem, Massachusetts, I was influenced early on by dark fashion, ouija boards and oddities. This influence followed me into my adult years at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, where I received a BFA in sculpture and jewelry-making, and spent a great deal of my time in the foundry casting giant insects out of bronze and iron.

My focus shifted primarily to jewelry in 2012 when I moved down to New Orleans. A self taught 3d modeler, I became interested in exploring the relationship between traditional jewelry making methods and 3d printing technology. I spent several years selling at the Frenchmen Art Market, an open air artist’s bazaar nestled between blaring jazz venues on a balmy, crowded street. A great deal of inspiration came to me while I was down there, and my creative narrative became clearer.

Now, in 2017, I have returned to my home state to pursue a full time focus on my witchy wares.
My head is swirling with visions of planchettes, and eyeballs, and seven-sided pyramids floating through space...
It is my sincere wish to fill this shop with curiosities and unusual fashion necessities that will not only catch your eye, but make you fall in love!

-S

Shop members

  • Stephanie

    Owner, Maker, Designer

Shop policies

More information

Last updated on Oct 30, 2017
Frequently asked questions
How do I design my 3D printed jewelry?

It begins as most art does: in a sketchbook.
I work through multiple drawings and renditions of an idea until I have dialed it in to its loveliest state.
Using a CAD (Computer-Aided Design) program, I can translate these drafts from my sketchbook into three-dimensional geometries on the XYZ planes of virtual space.
A lengthy, often arduous process of 3D modeling and trial & error ensues. It takes several weeks for each piece to be printed, but it often takes me months of experimentation, prototyping and minute mathematical adjustments to see one of my models through to its final state.

What is "sintered nylon?"

A strong, flexible nylon plastic that was printed through the SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) process.
In this technique, the object is built up slowly, thin layer by layer, with a powdered material that gets fused together by a laser.
Because of the ascending layers, it is sometimes possible to see a slight “woodgrain” texture in certain areas. I consider this to be one of the most subtle and beautiful attributes of the material and process!
This SLS method produces a much smoother and more professional matte finish than that of the FDM printers currently available for home use, which often produce jagged and uneven structures with a less refined, glossy, styrene plastic.
Deceptively lightweight, it's perfect for big earrings!

You can 3d print metal??

Yes!
I print my pieces in an alloy of 60% 420 stainless steel 40% bronze.

In this process, a specialty printer rolls out a layer of fine stainless steel powder and deposits small adhesive drops to the surface. This happens many, many, many times until the object is built up into a fragile, “sand castle” state.
The binding adhesive is then burned out as the piece is infused with bronze, creating your lovely solid metal object.
Just like with sintered nylon, the process sometimes imparts a subtle, pleasing "woodgrain" texture.
This material has a nice weight to it that makes it perfect for bangles, pendants and rings.